Newsday explains paywall

After revealing they only have 35 online only subscribers and their traffic has dropped by half, a Newsday exec sent out a memo explaining their paywall strategy in two basic points.

“Therefore, Newsday’s web strategy has two parts: 1) to provide Newsday’s print subscribers with a rich web experience that goes far beyond what they can get in the newspaper alone, thereby motivating them to remain, return, or choose to subscribe to Newsday; and 2) to provide Cablevision’s high-speed Internet customers with reasons to remain with Cablevision, reasons to return to Cablevision, or reasons to choose Cablevision.”

Unfortunately, the memo doesn’t mention their mobile web strategy which happens to be wide open for anyone to visit completing discouraging anyone from ponying up the $5 a week subscription to their full fledged web site.

Is geolocation the “holy grail” of mobile advertising?

Google and Apple are both racing to own the mobile advertising platform by adding the new “holy grail” of mobile advertising – geolocation.  The Wall Street Journal reports that both Google and Apple have bought mobile advertising companies and are attempting to leverage their mobile phones to let your local pizza parlor put an ad on your mobile when you start feeling hungry in the late afternoon.  They are reaching out to you and to your local business just like FourSquare to reach you where you are right at this moment.

Foursquares, newspapers and universities

A free Canadian newspaper, Metro,  has struck a deal with foursquare. As you travel around Canada checking  foursquare on your phone you’ll find Metro’s restaurant reviews, city tips, to-dos and stories. It’s a great use of foursquare’s geolocation technology giving the experts at local, your newspaper, a way to give you information about your immediate surroundings.

Foursquares deal with Metro comes after they created custom games for Harvard and UNC Charlotte.

Foursquare checks in with geolocation

I don’t know if mobile is the next big thing or already here, but adoption of geolocation in online tools is a must for mobile to achieve it’s full relevance. Since Foursquare just opened up in Little Rock, I’ve been playing with it via my iPhone this past week and although the number of users and  number of places is limited with next to none participating businesses,  I’m hooked.

A recent article in Time Magazine calls Foursquare’s gaming component it’s “secret sauce” letting you earn points, badges and become a “mayor” when checking-in at new places.  The article says the key to user adoption is for businesses to start give aways to foursquare users who check-in often at their business–  It’s like a frequent eater card, but works virtually. The only location in Little Rock that currently offers a foursquare special is the Capital Bar & Grill with every 10th check-in getting you a free dessert and the mayor receiving a free t-shirt.

I can’t wait until US Pizza starts giving away free pizza to users who have checked in ten times, but until then it’s fun to compare how many points (and check-ins) I can get to my friends.  If you haven’t tried it, go ahead and sign-up and download your app to your phone (they make apps for iPhone, Palm, Blackberry and Android) or use the mobile interface and friend me.

AT&T Service fails, but Google answers

The visual voicemail on my iPhone quit working about a month ago (I won’t say what caused it), but I called AT&T today to see if they could help me get it working again after missing a couple of voicemails.

Surprisingly, I didn’t have to hold for an operator at all, but the operator I got had me on hold several times as she tried to figure out my phone’s problem. After trying several different network changes on the AT&T side and several changes on my phone over the course of an hour, the support tech finally gave up and suggested I needed to reinstall the Surprisingly, I didn’t have to hold for an operator at all, but the operator I got had me on hold several times as she tried to figure out my phone’s problem. After trying several different network changes on the AT&T side and several changes on my phone over the course of an hour, the support tech finally gave up and suggested I needed to reinstall the iPhone OS and offered to connect me with an Apple support tech to help me out. I declined the Apple help and told her I could handle the reinstall myself. Before I hung up on her I she made an appointment to call me back the next morning to see if my voicemail was working correctly.

After I got off the phone, I turned to my trusty support database, google, and queried, “visual voicemail broken iphone” and on the second page, two minutes into my search, I found my solution– reset the network settings under Settings > General > Reset Network Settings. My phone restarted and I immediately got two visual voicemails– Problem fixed!

I thought I already knew this lesson, but I guess I learned it again– Google your problem before calling for support and more than likely you’ll find the answer your need. Now, I get to to explain to the AT&T tech how easy it was to solve the problem.